Posted on Design / Fashion / Interview / Profile

If clothes make the man, then Andrew Buckler is singlehandedly responsible for the emergence of a new kind of man on this side of the pond — the Bloke. More iconic internationally than our native “dude,” the “bloke” is a man imbued with classic masculinity who appreciates body-conscious clothing, not to show off a body perfected by countless hours in a posh health club but rather by an active urban lifestyle. In 1995, at the peak of the metrosexual movement in urban America, Buckler opened his first shop in New York’s Meatpacking District. Ever since then, fans of the brand — fashion industry types and regular “blokes” alike — have gathered each fashion week for his hotly anticipated show.

The Buckler brand was built on a simple concept:  “English Bloke meets New York” — not unlike the designer’s own story. Since founding the brand, Buckler has stayed true to this aesthetic season after season offering what can best be described as the “anti-uniform.”

“We tailor our clothes for the independent, creative and artistic man,” says Buckler. “We think progressively and pay attention to detail making the clothes comfortable and modern.”

If clothes make the man, then Andrew Buckler is singlehandedly responsible for the emergence of a new kind of man on this side of the pond — the Bloke. More iconic internationally than our native “dude,” the “bloke” is a man imbued with classic masculinity who appreciates body-conscious clothing, not to show off a body perfected by countless hours in a posh health club but rather by an active urban lifestyle. In 1995, at the peak of the metrosexual movement in urban America, Buckler opened his first shop in New York’s Meatpacking District. Ever since then, fans of the brand — fashion industry types and regular “blokes” alike — have gathered each fashion week for his hotly anticipated show.

The Buckler brand was built on a simple concept:  “English Bloke meets New York” — not unlike the designer’s own story. Since founding the brand, Buckler has stayed true to this aesthetic season after season offering what can best be described as the “anti-uniform.”

“We tailor our clothes for the independent, creative and artistic man,” says Buckler. “We think progressively and pay attention to detail making the clothes comfortable and modern.”

Early adopters of the brand swear by the Sexy Bastard and Skinny Bastard jeans. The Brit designer staged nothing less than a revolution in denim design by offering a skinny jean that sits lower than any American jean dared at the time. In fact, the waist sits so far below the natural waist that Buckler began offering the Sexy Bastard line of underwear right as assorted fashion types were fretting about whether to fold their waistbands down or go commando. Today, both the jeans and the low-rise underwear are staples of the stylish urbanite’s closet.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *